Halifax ER opens doors to ISANS students

From how to use their new health cards to the importance of calling 911 when experiencing an emergency, a group of Immigration Services Association of Nova Scotia clients learned the basics of the Canadian health care system during an interactive classroom session held Friday, Oct. 28 at the Halifax Infirmary.

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An Immigration Services Association of Nova Scotia employee chats with Haydar Al Shimmary, who moved to Canada from Iraq in June, about health concerns that could require a visit to the emergency department.
Laura Mackenzie of Immigration Services Association of Nova Scotia chats with Haydar Al Shimmary, who moved to Canada from Iraq in June, about health concerns that could require a visit to the emergency department.

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Immigration Services Association of Nova Scotia client Haydar Al Shimmary, who moved to Canada from Iraq in early summer, learns about triage, registration and other steps he would take when visiting the emergency department.
Immigration Services Association of Nova Scotia client Haydar Al Shimmary, who moved to Canada from Iraq in early summer, learns about triage, registration and other steps he would take when visiting the emergency department.

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Robert MacKinley, health services manager at the Halifax Infirmary’s emergency department, leads a classroom session to help teach local refugees about how to make use the hospital’s services.
Robert MacKinley, health services manager at the Halifax Infirmary’s emergency department, leads a classroom session to help teach local refugees about how to make use the hospital’s services.

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Halifax Infirmary emergency department health services manager Robert MacKinley and chief Dr. Samuel Campbell chat with a virtual Arabic translator during a classroom session held recently for local refugees in conjunction with the Immigration Services As
Halifax Infirmary emergency department health services manager Robert MacKinley and chief Dr. Samuel Campbell chat with a virtual Arabic translator during a classroom session held recently for local refugees in conjunction with the Immigration Services Association of Nova Scotia.

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Mohammad Hasan, 30, and Ebitsam Hasan, 27, siblings who came to Canada from Syria in January, learn about how to use the Halifax Infirmary’s various services, including a new virtual translation service and the emergency department.
Mohammad Hasan, 30, and Ebitsam Hasan, 27, siblings who came to Canada from Syria in January, learn about how to use the Halifax Infirmary’s various services, including a new virtual translation service and the emergency department.

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 Halifax Infirmary emergency department health services manager Robert MacKinley (background) and chief Dr. Samuel Campbell (forefront) point to a written Arabic translation on the Halifax Infirmary’s new virtual translator.
Halifax Infirmary emergency department health services manager Robert MacKinley (background) and chief Dr. Samuel Campbell (forefront) point to a written Arabic translation on the Halifax Infirmary’s new virtual translator.

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Robert MacKinley, health services manager at the Halifax Infirmary’s emergency department, shows Immigration Services Association of Nova Scotia client Alsede Getashew how to use a virtual translator, a service added to the Halifax Infirmary about three m
Robert MacKinley, health services manager at the Halifax Infirmary’s emergency department, shows Immigration Services Association of Nova Scotia client Atsede Getashew from Ethiopia how to use a virtual translator, a service added to the Halifax Infirmary about three months ago to help bridge language gaps between health providers such as doctors and new Canadians.